Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza


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Budo Society Musashi

Many gendai modern jujutsu systems have direct historical links to ancient martial arts traditions koryu. Most of Japan had been unified under the Tokugawa shogunate and techniques for confronting an armed attacker on the battlefield were no longer needed.

Yawara Ju-Jutsu website

Most systems of Edo jujutsu include extensive use of atemi waza vital-striking technique which are effective against an opponent dressed in normal street attire. Tokyo police units still train in their use and continue to carry a hojo cord in addition to handcuffs. Jujutsu is a learned skill or practice.

It may take a student more than twenty years to mature and perfect his skills.


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Jujutsu practitioners use every conceivable technique to win in combat, and train in the use of many potentially fatal moves. Students usually train in a non competitive environment, and are taught break-falling skills to minimize the risk of injury during practice. Although there is some diversity in the actual look and technique of the various traditional jujutsu systems, there are significant technical similarities.

Students learn traditional jujutsu primarily by observation and imitation of the ryu's waza techniques. Many schools emphasize joint-locking techniques threatening a joint's integrity by placing pressure on it in a direction contrary to its normal function, or aligning it so that muscular strength cannot be brought to bear or take-down or throwing techniques. In some circumstances, jujutsuka generate kuzushi breaking of balance by striking one's opponent along his weak line. Other methods of generating kuzushi include grabbing, twisting, or poking areas of the body known as pressure points areas of the body where nerves are close to the surface of the skin.

Either force is met with force directly, or the force of an attack is used to facilitate a defensive counter attack. The terms "hard" or "soft" are frequently used to characterize the style of a particular school.

Movements capitalize on an attacker's momentum and openings in order to place a joint in a compromised position or to break balance as preparation for a take-down or throw. The defender's own body is positioned so as to take optimal advantage of the attacker's weaknesses, while simultaneously presenting few openings or weaknesses of its own. Weapons might include, for example, the roku shaku bo six-foot staff , hanbo short staff , katana long sword , wakizashi or kodachi short sword , tanto knife , and jitte short one hook truncheon, also known as "power of ten hands" weapon, jute.

Because jujutsu encompasses so many techniques, it has become the foundation for a variety of modern styles and derivations. As each instructor incorporated new techniques and tactics into what was taught to him originally, he could create his own ryu or school.

Some of these schools modified the original techniques so much that they no longer considered themselves a style of jujutsu. Examples are present-day aikido; karate; and judo, which came into existence in , when a number of jujutsu schools joined the Kodokan established by Jigaro Kano. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, another divergence of jujutsu, developed a system that has become popular with exponents of modern martial sporting contests, and has dominated televised grappling competitions. It differs from jujutsu in that the exponent will try to block an attack in order to quickly attain a clinch.

Aikido, Aiki Jujitsu, Ju Jitsu, Kyusho Jitsu, Dim Mak, Bukido, Karate

From the clinch, a takedown is employed in order to turn the contest into a wrestling match. All Japanese jujutsu have cultural aspects which help give a sense of the traditional character of a school. Students are taught to maintain an atmosphere of courtesy and respect, in which they can cultivate the appropriate kokoro, or "heart.

There is a lack of ostentatious display, with an attempt to achieve a sense of rustic simplicity. There are no superficial distractions such as tournament trophies, long-term contracts, tags and emblems, or rows of badges. The philosophy underlying Japanese culture pervades the martial arts. Zen , Buddhism, Shintoism , and Confucianism influence both combat strategy and mental attitude.

Jujutsu expresses the philosophy of yielding to an opponent's force rather than trying to oppose force with force, manipulating an opponent's attack and controlling his balance. In order to be victorious, a warrior should cultivate three states of mind: An all-encompassing awareness, zanshin "remaining spirit" , in which the practitioner is ready for anything, at any time; the spontaneity of mushin "no mind" which allows immediate action without conscious thought; and a state of equanimity or imperturbability known as fudoshin "immovable mind".

Such mental mastery is possible only after a considerable period of serious and devoted training. Ki is used in every movement of the human body, and is believed to flow from the seka tanden, or geometric center of the human body, one or two inches below the navel. While it had a number of things I disagree with, it was an ambitious attempt to show what he thought would and wouldn't be effective as a self defense technique. I give it a low rating because I thought some of his observations were off base suggesting, for instance, that karate didn't throw low line kicks , but at times he was spot on busting the myths of the "death touch" and the like--he Tegner was roundly criticized in his day for his books on martial arts.

I give it a low rating because I thought some of his observations were off base suggesting, for instance, that karate didn't throw low line kicks , but at times he was spot on busting the myths of the "death touch" and the like--he was a skeptic before it was popular. I think it's worth reading, however.

I wouldn't spend a whole lot of money on it, though…get it used or at a library or book sale.

Self-Defense: Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu and Atemi-Waza

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  4. About Bruce Tegner. Bruce Tegner.

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    Bruce Tegner is a specialist in self-defense and sport forms of weaponless fighting. He is regarded to had been one of America's outstanding authority, teacher and innovator in this field. He was, literally, born to the teaching of unarmed fighting skills; both his parents were professional teachers of judo and jiu-jitsu and they began to train him when he was two years old.

    Pressure Point arts

    Until he was eight year Bruce Tegner is a specialist in self-defense and sport forms of weaponless fighting. Until he was eight years old, his mother and father taught him fundamentals; after that, he was instructed by Oriental and European experts. In a field where most individuals study only one phase of work, Mr. Tegner's background is unusual. His education covered many aspects of the various kinds of weaponless fighting and included instruction in sword and stick fighting, as well.

    Before he gave up competitive judo, he became the California state judo champion. He holds black belts in judo and karate.

    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza
    Self-Defense  Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza Self-Defense Nerve Centers & Pressure Points for Karate, Jujitsu & Atemi-Waza

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